Ai Wei Weis’ exhibition ‘@Large’ on Alcatraz island is about political prisoners and freedom of expression. I was disappointed to not see a Leonard Peltier piece. Sometimes you gotta remind them. #struggle

LEONARD is a Native American activist and member of the American Indian Movement (AIM). In 1977 he was convicted and sentenced to two consecutive terms of life imprisonment for first degree murder in the shooting of two Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agents during a 1975 conflict on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Peltier’s indictment and conviction have been the subject of much controversy; Amnesty International placed his case under the “Unfair Trials” category of its Annual Report: USA 2010.

Peltier is incarcerated at the United States Penitentiary, Coleman in Florida.

THOMAS GREYEYES: MURAL AT THE INTER-TRIBAL FRIENDSHIP HOUSE

This project was conceptualized by Tom GreyEyes with the help of Inter-tribal Friendship House youth, Tito Lanua. The mural takes on an anti GMO statement. It views industrial agriculture and the formulation of genetically modified organisms as a threat to Native culture and life ways. The mural intends to inspire a new generation of Native youth and encourage them to create cultural bridges with their elders.  GMOs created in a laboratory go through a violent trauma as they are shocked and as viruses are introduced to them to manipulate their DNA. This practice is a desecration of the sacredness and integrity of the plant life and of Mother Nature.

Ya’at’eeh! Please consider donating so that I may pursue a Master of Fine Arts degree in Social Practice at California College of the Arts this fall. It is with great faith and committment in my chosen path that I ask for your support. I have worked incredibly hard and produced a portfolio worthy of a $41,000 merit scholarship to help cover my $43,000 tuition. I do have my tribes scholarship that should take care of the rest and also part of my health insurance through the school. I still have my housing, food, transportation, class fees, and art supplies to pay for. I need your support more than ever to help me accomplish my goals.

http://www.gofundme.com/cv4ikw

GoFundMe Print Catalog

Prices listed are minimum donation and include shipping.

  1.  "Tsidił 1980" 4x6"   $10
  2. Hastiin Tsé Biiʼ Ndzisgaii 4x6”  $10
  3. Naabaahii 11x14”   $32
  4. "Yikáísdáhá" 11x14"   $32
  5. DeChelly1945 8x10”   $32
  6. CAYATANITO1874 8x10”    $32
  7. Cloud Woman 11x14”    $32
  8. EyesLikeArrows 11x14”   $32
  9. Water is Power 11x17”    $32
  10. Indigenous Resilience 11x17”    $32

http://www.gofundme.com/cv4ikw

lastrealindians:

Fighting with Spirit: How Greasy Grass was Won, By Ruth Hopkins
In ceremony, Sitting Bull gave 100 pieces of flesh. He went without water for two days and two nights. At Deer Medicine rocks, Sitting Bull was given a vision. During his life, Sitting Bull had several visions that came true. Yes, Tatanka Iyotanka (Sitting Bull) was a Chief, a statesman, and an exemplary warrior who was a sash wearer and member of the Kit Fox Society and the Midnight Strongheart Society, but he was also a respected holyman. He was a prophet.
In his vision, Sitting Bull saw soldiers riding on horseback, falling asunder into his camp. Their hats fell off. They fell like grasshoppers, he said. It was then that a voice told him: “I give these to you because they have no ears.” To Sitting Bull and other Lakota this vision meant they would have a great victory over the bluecoats. Sitting Bull’s vision occurred just two weeks before the Battle at Greasy Grass.
During the Battle of Greasy Grass, Sitting Bull did not fight because he was older. Instead, he gave his strong medicine to his nephews White Bull and One Bull, who did.
When Custer attacked, some warriors were just getting out of Inipi. They grabbed their weapons and started fighting right out of the sweat lodge. Was this because Custer caught the Lakota sleeping? No. The Lakota knew the 7th Cavalry was coming. Those men were in Inipi because ceremony and prayer are central to living Wolakota. We don’t compartmentalize our spiritual beliefs and keep them separate from the rest of who we are. This isn’t Sunday church service. Ceremony is life. We are to live our sacred ways every day the best we can.
We are a prayerful people, a soulful people. Spirituality is key to our identity as Oceti Sakowin, and the same can be said for many Natives who practice their traditional ways. We are spirits inhabiting bodies and there’s no defeating the spirit of a Native who is the living embodiment of his or her ancestors. This is something the Western Empire never fully understood, although they realized it was powerful. That’s why the government outlawed our sacred ceremonies for decades. We should all be thankful to those who kept them safe so we could pass them onto future generations.
Each of us is fighting a difficult battle- be it personal one, or for your family or community. Some fight addiction or trauma, others fight poverty, oppression, environmental destruction, or societal ignorance. Some of us are simply born to rage. Yet no matter your battle remember this: do as your ancestors did and consult the spirits. Let them help. Sitting Bull did. Purify yourself with sage and cedar. Pray. Sometimes that’s all you have, but it may be all you need. Arm yourself with the pipe, the canupa. This is the missing piece of our current puzzle, folks. Returning to the ways will bring healing and mend the sacred hoop.
READ THE REST HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/fighting-with-spirit-how-greasy-grass-was-won-by-ruth-hopkins/

lastrealindians:

Fighting with Spirit: How Greasy Grass was Won, By Ruth Hopkins

In ceremony, Sitting Bull gave 100 pieces of flesh. He went without water for two days and two nights. At Deer Medicine rocks, Sitting Bull was given a vision. During his life, Sitting Bull had several visions that came true. Yes, Tatanka Iyotanka (Sitting Bull) was a Chief, a statesman, and an exemplary warrior who was a sash wearer and member of the Kit Fox Society and the Midnight Strongheart Society, but he was also a respected holyman. He was a prophet.

In his vision, Sitting Bull saw soldiers riding on horseback, falling asunder into his camp. Their hats fell off. They fell like grasshoppers, he said. It was then that a voice told him: “I give these to you because they have no ears.” To Sitting Bull and other Lakota this vision meant they would have a great victory over the bluecoats. Sitting Bull’s vision occurred just two weeks before the Battle at Greasy Grass.

During the Battle of Greasy Grass, Sitting Bull did not fight because he was older. Instead, he gave his strong medicine to his nephews White Bull and One Bull, who did.

When Custer attacked, some warriors were just getting out of Inipi. They grabbed their weapons and started fighting right out of the sweat lodge. Was this because Custer caught the Lakota sleeping? No. The Lakota knew the 7th Cavalry was coming. Those men were in Inipi because ceremony and prayer are central to living Wolakota. We don’t compartmentalize our spiritual beliefs and keep them separate from the rest of who we are. This isn’t Sunday church service. Ceremony is life. We are to live our sacred ways every day the best we can.

We are a prayerful people, a soulful people. Spirituality is key to our identity as Oceti Sakowin, and the same can be said for many Natives who practice their traditional ways. We are spirits inhabiting bodies and there’s no defeating the spirit of a Native who is the living embodiment of his or her ancestors. This is something the Western Empire never fully understood, although they realized it was powerful. That’s why the government outlawed our sacred ceremonies for decades. We should all be thankful to those who kept them safe so we could pass them onto future generations.

Each of us is fighting a difficult battle- be it personal one, or for your family or community. Some fight addiction or trauma, others fight poverty, oppression, environmental destruction, or societal ignorance. Some of us are simply born to rage. Yet no matter your battle remember this: do as your ancestors did and consult the spirits. Let them help. Sitting Bull did. Purify yourself with sage and cedar. Pray. Sometimes that’s all you have, but it may be all you need. Arm yourself with the pipe, the canupa. This is the missing piece of our current puzzle, folks. Returning to the ways will bring healing and mend the sacred hoop.

READ THE REST HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/fighting-with-spirit-how-greasy-grass-was-won-by-ruth-hopkins/

dxtx:

SINCE 1974, federal relocation policy has forced 14,000 Dine’ (Navajo) people from their ancestral homeland in Arizona. This genocidal policy was crafted by government agents and energy company representatives in order to gain access to the mineral resources of Black Mesa – billions of tons of coal, uranium and natural gas.

For over 30 years, traditional Dine’ at Black Mesa have lived in resistance, steadfastly refusing to relocate as strip-mines rip apart their sacred lands and generating plants poison the desert air.

(Text via:  Black Mesa Indigenous SupportVideo via: Rob Rosenfeld)

BREAKDOWN:
Resolution Copper wants to build a mine in Chich’il Bidagoteel, a sacred site for the Apache people near Superior, AZ. The land now sits on National Forest land. A long-running battle over Native American land rights has the project in a holding pattern. And residents are looking to Congress to have the final say. Resolution and its parent companies have been trying for a decade to trade 5,556 acres they already own for 2,406 acres of the Tonto National Forest, which sit above the massive ore body.

The project owned by foreign mining giants U.K.-based Rio Tinto and Australia-based BHP Billiton — says the mine would create 1,400 jobs and generate $61 billion over its 40-year lifespan, plus construction and clean-up time. Block-cave is a mining process that excavates a large amount of rock and leaves a mountain-sized void underground, making subsidence and collapse inevitable. It would extract enough copper to meet 25 percent of U.S. demand of about 1 billion pounds of copper a year. It would also extract about 132,000 tons of rock daily from the ore body, which is 7,000 feet below ground. It’s projected to produce 1.7 billion tons of waste tailings.

Mine opponents argue that Resolution is pushing the land exchange to avoid key environmental studies that are mandated for mining on public land. The Sierra Club fears the mine “is going to destroy the water table and the biodiversity that exists.”

Voices from Community Members:
Vernelda Grant, archeologist for the San Carlos Apache Tribe, has said “There is a deeply personal, spiritual and visceral relationship between Apaches and the land” and her Apache ancestors fought miners for centuries and died trying to protect “Mother Earth.”

Wendsler Nosie, Former chairman of the San Carlos Apache tribe, wrote in a letter sent to a US Forestry Service official, that mining is inconsistent with conservative, traditional Apache values. “We have been taught to respect the natural world, and to keep it clean and natural. Our traditional relationship with the land is deep and personal. We depend on the natural world for our survival, and our survival depends on maintaining our personal relationships with all living things,” 

Nosie has also been quoted saying, “a return to the concept of “Mother Earth” for all Western peoples is ultimately the key to saving the planet.” He continued with,“We have to start deciding when enough is enough. I know Native people have a lot to offer if we are listened to. We know how to save this planet.”.

San Carlos point of contact: Vansler ‘Standing Fox’ at naaki.bball@gmail.com